MENU

St. Louis Wedding & Travel Photographer

Yesterday I enjoyed a misty morning walk around my neighborhood to observe a few invasive vines. There are two very visible invasive plants here, the honeysuckle and wisteria.

Growing up, I always loved the honeysuckle bush. Bright yellow flowers fill the air with their sweet honeyed aroma, immediately reminding me of Springtime. Little did I know back then that the honeysuckle vine is a rather aggressively invasive species to Missouri flora. This fact does not change my fond memories of the plant, but I view them in a different way, now.

Introduced into New York in the early 1800’s as both an ornamental fixture and and aid for wildlife habitats, the honeysuckle quickly began to dominate the plants around it. As a plant that twists, vines and roots its way in between other plants, honeysuckle tends to overgrow and smother the native plants beneath it. While the plant is great for combating soil erosion, there are many other behaviors that deem it invasive.

Invasive Vine Honeysuckle

While still closed, these honeysuckle flowers will soon open up to display their brightly-colored stamen to pollinating passers-by.

Similarly, I have always admired the Wisteria vine. The Wisteria has such an elevated elegance about it. Far-reaching vines sprouting beautiful dangling flowers makes for a lovely sight, but those far-reaching vines tend to suppress whatever it attaches itself to. However lovely, wisteria species are regarded as noxious to Missouri plant life and its propagation is discouraged. There is a large wisteria growth in my neighborhood and I was able to take a few photos before rain storms moved in early yesterday morning.

The Wisteria Vine, and Invasive Species

Not all species of wisteria are invasive to native plants. For green-thumbs wishing to add these lovely flora to their garden, American Wisteria and Evergreen Wisteria are non-invasive options.

I hope you will enjoy this collection of beautiful, invasive vines found in my neighborhood.

The Wisteria Vine, and Invasive Species
CLOSE